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Title: Worldwide public policies for celiac disease : are patients well assisted?
Authors: Falcomer, Ana Luísa
Luchine, Bruna Araújo
Gadelha, Hanna Ramalho
Szelmenczi, José Roberto
Nakano, Eduardo Yoshio
Farage, Priscila
Zandonadi, Renata Puppin
metadata.dc.identifier.orcid: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0370-3089
Assunto:: Saúde pública
Saúde pública - legislação
Doença celíaca
Issue Date: 5-Aug-2020
Publisher: Springer
Citation: FALCOMER, Ana Luísa et al. Worldwide public policies for celiac disease: are patients well assisted?. International Journal of Public Health, v. 65, p. 937-945, 2020. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00038-020-01451-x. Disponível em: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00038-020-01451-x.
Abstract: Objectives To evaluate public policies (PP) to celiac disease (CD) patients and classify countries regarding the level of assistance provided by the Public Policies for Celiac Disease Score. Methods Countries were scored from 0 to 6 according to the existence of PP regarding industrial food and meal regulations, health service support, food allowance/financial incentive, gluten-free (GF) food certification, and CD associations. Subsequently, countries were allocated to continents. In total, 192 countries are registered as members of the World Health Organization. Results The European continent (score 3.63) is the most advanced in CD patient care, followed by South America (2.86), North America (1.05), Asia (0.53), Oceania (0.5), and Africa (0.27). Industrial food regulations were the most frequent PP (40.6%). 15.6% of the countries display regulations for meals; 13.5% have health service support; 13.5% have policies of food allowance/financial incentive; 19.3% have GF certification; and 34.4% have celiac associations. Conclusions Policies regarding GF meals and food safety certification, health service support, and financial incentives need improvement to ensure correct treatment and reduce the diseases’ financial burden for celiac patients and governments.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00038-020-01451-x
metadata.dc.relation.publisherversion: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00038-020-01451-x
Appears in Collections:EST - Artigos publicados em periódicos
NUT - Artigos publicados em periódicos

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